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file13
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Post: #1
Injera
I was wandering around the web the other day and came across Ethipian Injera bread:
http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bre...njera.html

It uses a very odd flour called teff. So I walked to the store and bought some teff. Seven bucks for a one-pound bag? No wonder why the Ethiopians are starving!

I made the bread, was kind of buckwheat-ish... rather good, although I used too much vegetable oil to grease the pan. Next time I'll try it with just Pam to see if that works.

All i need now is something to dip it in. Hummus or Indian chickpea-stuff doesn't seem quite right. I guess I need to research Ethiopian recipes.
10-26-2003 12:54 PM
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arianej Offline
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Post: #2
Injera
file13 Wrote:I was wandering around the web the other day and came across Ethipian Injera bread:
http://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/bre...njera.html

It uses a very odd flour called teff. So I walked to the store and bought some teff. Seven bucks for a one-pound bag? No wonder why the Ethiopians are starving!

Ouch! I paid $6.69 for 4.4 lbs. of teff, you might want to shop around. :shake: I haven't attempted making injera on our own, so I've bookmarked that recipe, it looks good. Thanks!

Quote:I made the bread, was kind of buckwheat-ish... rather good, although I used too much vegetable oil to grease the pan. Next time I'll try it with just Pam to see if that works.

All i need now is something to dip it in. Hummus or Indian chickpea-stuff doesn't seem quite right. I guess I need to research Ethiopian recipes.

I love Ethiopian food. At least, what I've tried of it, I loved. It's highly spiced food (although not necessarily spicy) and absolutely wonderful. The flavors are comparable to Indian food, I suppose, although I find Ethiopian to be far less rich than most Northern Indian restaurants around here. Some of our favorites are:

Doro Wat Chicken--spicy chicken stew with hard boiled eggs
Yebeg Tibs--chunks of lamb with onion and bell pepper
Mentchedabesh (sp?)--ground lamb with spices
Gomen--collard greens with (I think) onion and tomato
Shiro--pureed chickpeas with spices
Kik Alichia--yellow split peas

I don't know if you're familiar with the traditional serving style, but the food is heaped on a giant piece of injera with extra injera on the side to scoop it up. You have the benefit of eating the sauce-soaked injera on the bottom when you're done. :lick:

Ariane
10-26-2003 03:34 PM
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file13
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Post: #3
Injera
arianej Wrote:Doro Wat Chicken--spicy chicken stew with hard boiled eggs
Yebeg Tibs--chunks of lamb with onion and bell pepper
Mentchedabesh (sp?)--ground lamb with spices
Gomen--collard greens with (I think) onion and tomato
Shiro--pureed chickpeas with spices
Kik Alichia--yellow split peas

I don't know if you're familiar with the traditional serving style, but the food is heaped on a giant piece of injera with extra injera on the side to scoop it up. You have the benefit of eating the sauce-soaked injera on the bottom when you're done. :lick:

I'll search around the fancy grocery stores to see if the ethnic food sections have this stuff.

And, yes, I've done Ethiopian before... it's been a while, and when I saw the recipe I just had to investigate. A delicious conclusion. Wink
10-26-2003 05:01 PM
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